The TLT Group
A Non-Profit Organization
 

FRLV! Dec 1 Increase Student Motivation and Engagement for Learning; Using Principles Extracted from Gamification

  • 01 Dec 2017
  • 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
  • Online meeting info in Registration Confirmation Email [also check your Junk folder] and via email 24 hours prior to event start

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FridayLive!
Increase Student Motivation and Engagement for Learning
Using Principles Extracted from Gamification

Date: December 1, 2017 2 pm Eastern
Guest: Irina Ivliyeva, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Russian, Missouri University of Science and Technology

Moderators: Steve Gilbert, TLT Group, Sally Gilbert, TLT Group, Beth Dailey, TLT Group

Description

We will explore how principles extracted from gaming (especially online video gaming) can be applied to higher education for the purposes of increasing student motivation and engagement, and improving student learning.

Gamification can take many forms, ranging from a simple survey activity (e.g., using Kahoot) to the use of a more elaborate online video game such as Minecraft... and many others.

[Also, see a simple intro for those who know nothing yet about Minecraft: "...MINEMUM "Minecraft Help for Desperate Parents"]

NOTE: We will include some closely related questions emerging from FridayLive! discussions - questions that have recently preoccupied Steve Gilbert:

1. What are some examples of successful educational gamification?

What are some examples of adaptations of widely-used online video games (adaptations that are currently being used effectively for educational purposes)?

2. What are some examples of successful online video games without "unwanted elements"?

What are some examples of widely-used online video games that do not include "unwanted elements" (e.g., violence, sexism, racism, offensive language, predatory/daring/bullying behavior, etc.)?

3. How can gamification succeed in education without "unwanted elements"?

In what ways can the apparently powerful features and interactive design principles of online video games be transferred effectively to improve educational activities WITHOUT TRANSFERRING "unwanted elements" (e.g., violence, sexism, racism, offensive language, predatory/daring/bullying behavior, etc.)?

4. How can benefits of online video games be recreated via other categories of online resources and learning games?

In what ways can the apparently powerful features and interactive design principles of online video games be recreated effectively to improve educational activities via other categories of "gamification"?

[See "Definitions and Categories of Gamification" 4 categories:
1. Online Learning Games; 2. Online Game Emulations; 3. Online Video Games; 4. Tools Adaptable for Online Learning Games.
- From website for TLT Group's FridayLive! Oct 13, 2017]

[Also see "7 Online Tools to Make Custom Learning Games (No Coding Required!)," by Elizabeth Kahn, March 21, 2017:

"digital tools that allow teachers and students to create games to make the repetition of information fun, rather than a chore.

"...lessons where the students generate games for study review in any content area and across grade levels. Here are a few of the tools... " NOTE: This list includes several items we have already recommended, but the full list has not been reviewed by the TLT Group: Flippity, Digital Jeopardy, Kahoot, Quizlet, Memorize.com, Vocabulary.com, Dustbin Game.]

NOTE:  Login instructions for the session will be sent in the Registration Confirmation Email. Please check your Junk folder as sometimes these emails get trapped there. We will also send an additional login reminder 24 hours prior to the start of the event.

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